Tag Archives: Work

The Code…Ride For The Brand

The term “brand” goes back thousands of years and originally meant “to burn”. To the cowboy of the American West, the “brand” not only identified the ownership of cattle, but it also became the symbol of loyalty, pride, and commitment. Some people credit Louis L’amour for coming up with the term “Ride for the Brand,” but I can imagine some cow boss telling a slacker hired hand cowboy that if he wasn’t going to “Ride for the Brand,” he might as well hit the trail. It was his way of communicating that if he wasn’t going to work hard, take pride in his work, and be loyal to his employer, then he didn’t need to be working there. Riding for the brand was, and is a great way to sum up a how to have a good employee/employer relationship, but the phrase can be applied in a number of ways.
As an equipment dealer, we are proud of our brand. We are constantly working to build the reputation of. We brand our caps, tractors, uniforms, buildings, advertising, and just about anything we can think of that is related to Great Plains. We are also proud of the brands we represent, and “Ride for those Brands” each and every time we open our doors. Our goal is to communicate to our customers through our actions that is the “Brand to Ride With”.
As a Christian, “Riding for the Brand”    is really summed up in a scripture that I should remember every day. Colossians 3:23 says.
“Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people.”
My goal in life is to ride for the    and even though I make many mistakes, fall off my horse, and disappoint my Heavenly Father, I hope that at the end of the day, people will see by my actions that I belong to Jesus.
In my opinion, the best example of a person “Riding for the Brand” occurred a couple of thousand years ago, long before the cowboy rode the range on the Great Plains. The apostle Paul was beaten, stoned, shipwrecked, whipped and imprisoned numerous times and said in Galatians 6:17 that “I bear on my body the scars that show that I belong to Jesus”.
Isn’t that what a “brand” is?

This story and others posted in this blog are originally published in Great Plains living.  The official magazine of Great Plains Kubota.

The Limb Saw

No More Ladders, Lifts, Buckets or Hand Held Chainsaws or Pole Pruners

     Fall on the farm is a great time for clean up.  The weather is nice, the crops are in, and calves have been born.  This is when farmers and ranchers can  take the time to make their place look neat and tidy. Taking pride in the year’s worth of hard work is ingrained in the lives of farmers and ranchers.  They do what has to be done, and they do it by whatever means possible, and with whatever tools are at hand.  Sometimes safety is sacrificed, especially when it comes to pruning trees.  Whether its a ladder, or the bucket of a tractor, maintaining tree growth can be dangerous, but with the safety and the affordability of the LimbSaw, farmers and ranchers can not only cut limbs safely, but they can do it without any help other than their tractor.
The LimbSaw easily attaches and mounts directly to the front end loader of your tractor, skid loader or backhoe. This commercial-grade chainsaw hooks in  to a receiver on the back of your front end loader or bucket and connects to your tractor’s auxiliary hydraulics.  It’s extra long reach can cut limbs that are 18 to 20 feet, depending on your loader reach. The LimbSaw attachment folds into a convenient transport position, and at only 84 lbs makes it easy to remove and store in your shop or garage.  This saw attachment is super fast and super safe making it ideal for a one man job. At 5,000 RPM’s this saw has incredible cutting power, but it doesn’t take away power to operate.  It only requires seven gallons of hydraulic flow to operate the 12 horsepower chainsaw, making it a perfect fit for compact tractors to skid steers.  It features a reversible motor that backs the saw out of any pinch, and it’s equipped with a self oiling system.  To top it off the bar and chain are interchangeable with most chainsaw manufacturers.
Other than it’s ease of use the LimbSaw is the safest way to trim trees.  The LimbSaw drastically reduces the risk of injury by eliminating common practices such as, precariously placed ladders or climbing in and out of loader buckets while operating a hand held saw.  When cut, limbs fall in front of the loader while you sit in the safety and comfort of your tractor seat. In addition, the danger of chainsaw kickback is virtually eliminated.  A shock indicator has been added which allows the user to know how much pressure to put on the saw.  Like any chainsaw it’s important to let the saw do the cutting, it’s no different with the LimbSaw, and this easy to see indicator make for easy cutting.
Titanium Blade
While most chainsaw bars are laminated, the LimbSaw’s bar is made from a single piece of solid titanium alloy steel, and is laser cut for precision.
Aggressive Chain
Kickback is not an issue with the LimbSaw because each saw is equipped with an aggressive chain that utilizes each and every tooth for maximum cutting power.
Steel Construction
For unsurpassed durability, the LimbSaw’s extension arm is made from heavy-duty square tubing that is double-walled at the cutting end.
The loader mounted, hydraulic powered chainsaw that is sold today as LimbSaw was invented by Wendell McCracken of Pauls Valley, OK.  A retiree with a master’s degree in Electrical Engineering, Wendall and his wife Donna raised eight children on their 250 acre pecan and cattle farm where tree trimming was an ongoing family chore.  Now you can find the LimbSaw Company owner, Frank Casey assembling  his products in his shop behind his house near Norman, OK.  Casey and his wife run the business, but not without the help of a few part-time employees and the streamlined manufacturing of Prifert.  With Prifert handling the manufacturing, Casey can focus on assembly and distribution to dealers like Great Plains Kubota.  This is the ninth year Casey has had the chainsaw on the market, and two years ago Casey developed a circular saw.
The LimbSaw Company Circular Saw was developed for trimming under fence lines and cutting branches that are too small for chainsaws.  Using the same concept of trimming from the comfort and safety of your tractor seat, users can regain areas of property and fence lines that are unusable due to brushy overgrowth.  Regrowth can be too flexible for chainsaws which only grab instead of cut, but with circular saw one can literally trim a hedge.  When used with the rotating actuator, you can pivot this tool 22, 30, 45 and 90 degrees to allow trimming at angles and under fence lines. The cutting head is also interchangeable onto the 8 ft. mast of the original tool (Limbinator Saw, LS08). The total weight of the new LSC Circular Saw with mast is 105 lbs.
Manufactured with unsurpassed durability, every detail of LimbSaw products have been tailored for optimum safety and function.
These affordable saws are perfect for farmers, ranchers, highway departments, municipalities, and even hunters.  There are a lot of saw attachments on the market today, but the LimbSaw is the ideal saw for pruning and trimming.
See the saws at work at your local Great Plains Kubota, or on the LimbSaw Company L.L.C on Facebook page.

This story and others posted in this blog are originally published in Great Plains living.  The official magazine of Great Plains Kubota.

Always Finish What You Start

By: Bill Clark (President Of Great Plains Kubota)

From: 2015 Summer Issue of Great Plains living

I grew up in Duncan near the Chisolm Trail, which ran very close to what is now Hwy. 81.  In fact, the Chisolm Trail Heritage Museum is now located a few hundred feet from the home I lived in until the sixth grade.  Museums have been built, movies have been made, and numerous books written to commemorate this important part of history.  Even though I literally grew up next to the trail, I took for granted what it took to complete the task of driving cattle to market.  To drive cattle up the Chisolm Trail was hard, dangerous, and dirty work that once started, couldn’t be stopped until the mostly wild longhorn cattle were delivered to their pens near Abilene, KS.  It usually took over two months to complete the entire journey from south Texas to northern Kansas.  These cowboys had no weekends, no time off for injuries, no comp time, no compressed work schedules, just a little sleep on the ground while working to keep the cattle together and headed up the trail.  This determination is one of the characteristics that made the American Cowboy a hero in the minds of many, and has shaped what we know of today as a good work ethic.
I can imagine that many of the cowboys wanting to hire on for the ride were told by the cow boss that if they started, they had to finish.  In fact, most of the cowboys got paid at the end of the trail when the cattle were sold, so if they quit along the way they didn’t get paid anything.  Even if there is not payday at the end, there’s still the satisfaction in completing what you start, especially when the job isn’t easy.  I vividly remember coming home from school one day wanting to try out for football, and my Dad warning me that it will be tough.
He said, “Billy, if you start, you can’t quit.”
On the hot two-a-day practices that I sure thought about quitting on, but I’d hear my Dad’s words ringing in my ears, and knew that I just had to tough it out.  We didn’t have a winning team, but I was really glad I finished when I got my new letter jacket.
Finishing what we start at Great Plains Kubota is a key part of our brand promise of, “The Brand That Works For You.”  You have work to do, and our job is to be sure that your equipment is prepared for the task.  Our commitment is that if we service your equipment, and it’s not right, it will be on us.  We appreciate the opportunity to serve you, and truly want to know if we have not completed the job we started.  Not just because we want to get paid, but because we want to finish what we started in order for you to complete your work.
Arguably, on of the wisest person who ever lived was King Solomon.  He tried everything under the sun hoping to find meaning and fulfillment in life.  He found very few things that truly brought about satisfaction.  He did find that finishing something was better than starting something.  He wrote in Ecclesiastes 7:8 – Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: